Category Archives: Pop Up Books

Tails

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This book used to be very popular and (rather amazingly) survived the boys’ toddler years without significant damage. There are some cute bouncy rhymes, but the big attraction were the sturdy interactive features: textures, scratch-and-sniff skunk, pull tabs, flaps, and lots of fur.

Author: Matthew Van Fleet
Illustrator: Matthew Van Fleet

Birds of a Feather

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This book doesn’t have many total pages, but it is enormous (well over a foot tall and almost a foot wide), heavy, and attractive. It very well designed; filled with interesting flaps, pop ups, puzzles, and avian tidbits; and recommended for kids large enough to pick it up easily and treat it gently.

Author: Bernadette Gervais and Francesco Pittau
Illustrator: Bernadette Gervais and Francesco Pittau

 

Encyclopedia Prehistorica series

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Layers upon layers of scientific information are presented in this series through eye-popping pop ups (each double page spread has one big pop up, plus lots of smaller ones hidden in mini-attached pages). It is perfect for kids who love animals and science (and have learned to be gentle with delicate books).

Author: Matthew Reinhart
Illustrator: Robert Sabuda

Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland

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I tried reading the original version of Alice in Wonderland to my oldest about a year ago as our before-bed-chapter-book.  It did not click; we abandoned it.  This version, on the other hand, has been entirely successful.  It contains the essence of the story, the visuals are wonderful, and it never feels too long.  Both boys are thrilled when I pull it out.

Author:  Adapted from Lewis Carroll’s book
Illustrator:  Robert Sabuda in the style of John Tenniel

The Wheels on the Bus

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When the boys were around 2 years old, this was one of our most popular books.  We read (sang) this over and over and over and over again.  Watching the people on Sylvie Kantorovitz Wickstrom’s bus go all through the (beautiful French) town was fun, even the 7th time in a row.

Sometimes we read the Paul O. Zelinsky version for a bit of variety and to enjoy the paper engineering.  And the boys enjoy the video Scholastic made from the Zelinsky version.  (Who knew Kevin Bacon could sing?)  But it is the Wickstrom version that my youngest “read” to daddy tonight.

Author:  Unknown
Illustrator:  Sylvie Kantorovitz Wickstrom